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The Cost Structure of Routine Infant Immunization Services: A Systematic Analysis of Six Countries

This article, published in Health Policy and Planning, describes the results of an analysis of routine infant immunization program cost structures in six low- and middle-income countries. Using a unique dataset of routine infant immunization costs from 319 sites in Benin, Ghana, Honduras, Moldova, Uganda, and Zambia, the authors estimated how costs were distributed across budget categories and programmatic activities, and investigated how the cost structure of immunization sites varied by country and site characteristics. Site-level costs (including vaccines) represented 77 to 93 percent of national routine infant immunization costs. Based on the regression analyses, sites with the highest service volume had a greater proportion of costs devoted to vaccines, with vaccine costs per dose relatively unaffected by service volume but non-vaccine costs substantially lower with higher service volume. Across all countries, more efficient sites had a lower cost share devoted to labor. The substantial variation observed in this sample suggests differences in operating models for otherwise similar sites, and further understanding of these differences could reveal approaches to improve efficiency and performance of immunization sites.

Author: Geng F, Suharlim C, Brenzel L, Resch SC, Menzies NA

Published: 2017

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(Located at academic.oup.com)

Citation: Geng F, Suharlim C, Brenzel L, Resch SC, Menzies NA. The Cost Structure of Routine Infant Immunization Services: A Systematic Analysis of Six Countries. Health Policy and Planning. 2017;32(8):1174-1184.

Resource types: Peer-reviewed journal

Diseases/vaccines: Not disease/vaccine specific

Topics: Childhood immunization, Introduction and service delivery, Immunization financing

Regions: Global