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Sequelae of Epidemic Meningococcal Meningitis in Africa

This article, published in Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, reviews audiological and other long-term neurological sequelae in 157 cases and their controls 6 to 12 months after an epidemic of group A meningococcal meningitis in rural West Africa. The study found no difference in conductive hearing loss between cases and controls, and sensorineural hearing loss and other cranial nerve sequelae occurred significantly more frequently in males than in females. Additionally, sensorineural hearing loss and loss of visual acuity were found significantly more frequently in cases whose treatment was delayed for four days or more, compared with those who received treatment sooner. ABSTRACT ONLY. (Learn how users in developing countries can gain free access to journal articles.)

Author: Smith AW, Bradley AK, Wall RA, et al.

Published: 1988

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(Located at trstmh.oxfordjournals.org)

Citation: Smith AW, Bradley AK, Wall RA, et al. Sequelae of Epidemic Meningococcal Meningitis in Africa. Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. 1988;82(2):312-320.

Resource types: Peer-reviewed journal

Diseases/vaccines: Meningococcus

Topics: Disease burden and surveillance, Disease/vaccine specific information

Regions: Africa