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Serial Vaccination and the Antigenic Distance Hypothesis: Effects on Influenza Vaccine Effectiveness During A(H3N2) Epidemics in Canada, 2010–2011 to 2014–2015

This article, published in The Journal of Infectious Diseases, examines the antigenic distance hypothesis (AHD) in the context of serial influenza vaccination in Canada. The study found that the effects of repeat influenza vaccination varied slightly by season but were consistent overall with the AHD and may have contributed to low vaccine effectiveness findings across recent A/H3N2 epidemics in Canada.

Author: Skowronski DM, Chambers C, De Serres G, et al.

Published: 2017

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(Located at academic.oup.com)

Citation: Skowronski DM, Chambers C, De Serres G, et al. Serial Vaccination and the Antigenic Distance Hypothesis: Effects on Influenza Vaccine Effectiveness During A(H3N2) Epidemics in Canada, 2010–2011 to 2014–2015. The Journal of Infectious Diseases. 2017;215(7):1059-1099. 

Resource types: Peer-reviewed journal

Diseases/vaccines: Influenza

Topics: Vaccine safety and performance, Disease/vaccine specific information

Regions: North America and Europe