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Substantial Decline in Vaccine-Type Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Among Vaccinated Young Women During the First 8 Years After HPV Vaccine Introduction in a Community

This article, published in Clinical Infectious Diseases, reports on a series of three short-term surveillance studies that examined the epidemiological impact of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine introduction over time. Specifically, the authors examined trends in vaccine-type HPV in all, vaccinated, and unvaccinated young women during the eight years following vaccine introduction, in order to assess changes in HPV prevalence and characterize herd protection. The authors found that the prevalence of vaccine-type HPV decreased by more than 90 percent in vaccinated women, demonstrating high vaccine effectiveness, and by more than 30 percent in unvaccinated women, providing evidence of herd protection.

Author: Kahn JA, Widdice LE, Ding L, et al.

Published: 2016

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(Located at cid.oxfordjournals.org)

Citation: Kahn JA, Widdice LE, Ding L, et al. Substantial Decline in Vaccine-Type Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Among Vaccinated Young Women During the First 8 Years After HPV Vaccine Introduction in a Community. Clinical Infectious Diseases. 2016;63(10):1281-1287.

Resource types: Peer-reviewed journal

Diseases/vaccines: Human papillomavirus (HPV)

Topics: Disease burden and surveillance, Vaccine safety and performance, Disease/vaccine specific information

Regions: North America and Europe