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Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection in Infants in Rural Nepal

Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a leading cause of infant mortality worldwide, but the risk of RSV is not well-characterized in resource-limited settings. This article, published in Journal of Infection, reports the results of a study that aimed to obtain precise estimates of risk factors and disease burden of RSV in infants in rural southern Nepal. The authors found that RSV caused a significant burden of respiratory illness, and preterm infants were at the highest risk. They conclude that preterm infants should be considered a priority group for RSV preventive interventions in resource-limited settings.

Author: Chu HY, Katz J, Tielsch J, et al.

Published: 2016

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(Located at www.sciencedirect.com)

Citation: Chu HY, Katz J, Tielsch J, et al. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection in Infants in Rural Nepal. Journal of Infection. 2016;73(2):145-154.

Resource types: Peer-reviewed journal

Diseases/vaccines: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)

Topics: Disease burden and surveillance, Disease/vaccine specific information

Regions: Asia