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Evaluating Vaccination Strategies for Reducing Infant Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection in Low-Income Settings

Infants account for the majority of severe respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) burden, but they are a problematic RSV vaccine target population due to their immunological immaturity. This article, published in BMC Medicine, reports on a study that used an individual-based model to investigate RSV transmission patterns in a rural setting to evaluate the potential effectiveness of alternative vaccine targets in reducing RSV infant infection. The authors found that household transmission was responsible for 39 percent of infant infections, and school-age children were the main source of infection within the household. The model showed that annual vaccination of students was the only alternative strategy to routine immunization of infants able to trigger a relevant and persistent reduction in infant infection, which supported efforts to develop vaccines targeting beyond those at highest risk of severe disease.

Author: Poletti P, Merler S, Ajelli M, et al.

Published: 2015

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(Located at bmcmedicine.biomedcentral.com)

Citation: Poletti P, Merler S, Ajelli M, et al. Evaluating Vaccination Strategies for Reducing Infant Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection in Low-Income Settings. BMC Medicine. 2015;13:49.

Resource types: Peer-reviewed journal

Diseases/vaccines: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)

Topics: Disease burden and surveillance, Disease/vaccine specific information

Regions: Africa