Gastroenteritis Hospitalizations in Older Children and Adults in the United States Before and After Implementation of Infant Rotavirus Vaccination

This article, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, reports on a study that explored the indirect impact of rotavirus vaccines on older age groups. The authors assessed patterns of gastroenteritis hospitalizations among children aged five years or older and among adults before and after the introduction of rotavirus vaccines in the United States (2000 to 2010). Compared with pre-vaccine years, significant reductions in rotavirus-specific diarrhea hospitalizations occurred up to age 25 in 2008, age 15 in 2009, and across all age groups in 2010, which is when there was the greatest decline in rotavirus hospitalizations among vaccine-eligible young children. The authors conclude that the reductions they saw are consistent with indirect protections resulting from infant rotavirus vaccination. ABSTRACT ONLY. (Learn how users in developing countries can gain free access to journal articles.)

Author(s): GastaƱaduy PA, Curns AT, Parashar UD, Lopman BA

Published: 2013

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    Citation: GastaƱaduy PA, Curns AT, Parashar UD, Lopman BA. Gastroenteritis Hospitalizations in Older Children and Adults in the United States Before and After Implementation of Infant Rotavirus Vaccination. Journal of the American Medical Association. 2013;310(8):851-853.