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Intradermal Delivery of Vaccines: Potential Benefits and Current Challenges

This article, published in the Bulletin of the World Health Organization, explores the ways by which the delivery of vaccine antigens to the dermis and/or epidermis layers of the skin (i.e., intradermal vaccine delivery) might be more efficient than injection into the muscle or subcutaneous tissue, thereby reducing the required volumes of antigen. This type of dose-sparing could help to reduce costs associated with the purchase, distribution, and storage of vaccines—potentially helping to increase vaccine availability and effectiveness. The article also explores the need for further research and development, especially in the topic areas of uptake and implementation.

Author: Hickling JK, Jones KR, Friede M, Zehrung D, Chen D, Kristensen D

Published: 2011

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1006 KB PDF (Located at www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov)

Citation: Hickling JK, Jones KR, Friede M, Zehrung D, Chen D, Kristensen D. Intradermal Delivery of Vaccines: Potential Benefits and Current Challenges. Bulletin of the World Health Organization. 2011;89(3):221–226.

Resource types: Newsletter/article

Diseases/vaccines: Not disease/vaccine specific

Topics: Delivery technologies

Regions: Global