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A Role for Immune Complexes in Enhanced Respiratory Syncytial Virus Disease

Administration of a formalin-inactivated vaccine against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) to children in the 1960s resulted in increased morbidity and mortality in vaccine recipients who subsequently contracted RSV. This incident precluded development of subunit RSV vaccines for infants for over 30 years, because the mechanism of illness was never clarified. The authors of this article, published in The Journal of Experimental Medicine, demonstrate that enhanced RSV disease is mediated by immune complexes and abrogated in complement component C3 and B cell-deficient mice but not in controls. Further, they show correlation with the enhanced disease observed in children by providing evidence of complement activation in postmortem lung sections from children with enhanced RSV disease. This study provides a new model for enhanced RSV disease that can be used to screen future candidate vaccines. ABSTRACT ONLY. (Learn how users in developing countries can gain free access to journal articles.)

Author: Polack FP, Teng MN, Collins PL, et al.

Published: 2002

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(Located at jem.rupress.org)

Citation: Polack FP, Teng MN, Collins PL, et al. A Role for Immune Complexes in Enhanced Respiratory Syncytial Virus Disease. The Journal of Experimental Medicine. 2002;196(6):859-865.

Resource types: Peer-reviewed journal

Diseases/vaccines: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)

Topics: Disease/vaccine specific information

Regions: Global