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Passive Protection Against Respiratory Syncytial Virus Disease in Infants: the Role of Maternal Antibody

Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is responsible for serious respiratory disease in young infants. The authors of this article, published in The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, discuss the importance of maternal antibody in the immunity against RSV disease. The authors conclude that the safety of maternally derived antibody would likely surpass that of exogenously administered antibody and would have a decreased cost. They also evaluate the disadvantages of maternal immunization to protect infants against RSV, which could include the potential inhibition of the infant's response to active immunization or subsequent disease, the lack of antibody transfer in premature infants, and liability issues. ABSTRACT ONLY. (Learn how users in developing countries can gain free access to journal articles.)

Author: Englund JA

Published: 1994

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Citation: Englund JA. Passive Protection Against Respiratory Syncytial Virus Disease in Infants: the Role of Maternal Antibody. The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal. 1994;13(5):449–453.

Resource types: Peer-reviewed journal

Diseases/vaccines: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)

Topics: Vaccine safety and performance, Disease/vaccine specific information

Regions: North America and Europe