Accelerating Innovation

Introduction

PATH accelerates innovation that transforms lives. Here’s what PATH and our partners catalyzed in 2013.

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Bringing innovation to life

From PATH’s president and board chair

As the leading innovator in global health, PATH is driven by an unshakeable commitment to health equity and a bold belief in the power of innovation to improve health and save lives, especially among women and children. We bring together the right tools and people at the right time and place, accelerating innovations that create better health and new opportunities for all.

In 2013, PATH and our partners touched the lives of more than 219 million people with new vaccines and drug treatments, breakthrough health tools, and powerful strategies to change the course of disease. The milestones featured here reflect the very best of PATH—and our ingenuity, insight, and relentless determination to dismantle every barrier to progress.

Illustration of PATH’s five innovation platforms.

We know we can do even more. This year, we launched a new One PATH strategy that harnesses PATH’s unique capabilities and broad network of partners across five platforms—vaccines, drugs, diagnostics, devices, and system and service innovations. This five-year strategy will sharpen our focus on tackling the top health threats to women and children, significantly contributing to the Millennium Development Goals and other global targets. Together with our partners, we will accelerate our work on the nearly 200 tools and technologies in our development pipeline to bring health within reach for everyone.

Our commitment to collaboration and to the effective use of the resources entrusted to us remains central to our work. With your support, we are fueling transformative change in the lives of the world’s most vulnerable women and children. Thank you for your continued partnership.

Steve Davis signanture

Steve Davis
President and CEO

George Gotsadze signature

George Gotsadze, MD, PhD
Chair, Board of Directors

Vaccines

Trailblazing strategies to develop and deliver vaccines

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Vaccines

PATH accelerates the development and delivery of lifesaving vaccines. Our portfolio includes vaccines for diarrheal disease, influenza, Japanese encephalitis, malaria, meningitis, pneumococcal disease, polio, and more, as well as innovative delivery strategies to ensure vaccines reach the most vulnerable people.

Milestone

Landmark protection for Asia’s children

with a Japanese encephalitis vaccine now approved by WHO

Impact

200 million+ people vaccinated in 11 countries.

PATH led a ten-year effort that turned a little-known vaccine from China into an internationally approved tool to fight Japanese encephalitis, a disease that kills three in ten people infected.

We identified an effective vaccine in China that was virtually unknown outside the country. We helped the manufacturer meet regulatory standards, secured an affordable public-sector price, and prepared countries to introduce it. The World Health Organization (WHO) granted the vaccine its stamp of approval in October 2013. Now we are working with partners to continue rolling out the vaccine across Asia, starting with campaigns in Laos and Cambodia that are expected to reach more than 500,000 children by 2015.

Countries across Asia have rolled out the Japanese encephalitis vaccine with PATH’s support.
Map showing 2006–2013 rollout of JE vaccine from China to Nepal, India, Sri Lanka, Myanmar, Thailand, Vietnam, Malaysia, North Korea, and South Korea; and 2014 campaigns in Laos and Cambodia.

Key partners: Chengdu Institute of Biological Products; China National Biotec Group Co., Ltd.; GAVI Alliance; WHO; ministries of health across Asia.

Key funders: Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation; individual contributors.

Milestone

A historic drop in meningitis cases

and a breakthrough that could help vaccines reach the most remote areas

Impact

No cases of meningitis A among the 153 million+ Africans vaccinated since 2010.

New evidence confirms the groundbreaking impact of the MenAfriVac® vaccine, developed by PATH, WHO, and Serum Institute of India Ltd. to protect against deadly meningitis A. According to a study in the Lancet, the incidence of meningitis of any kind dropped by 94% following a mass immunization campaign in Chad.

A second study found that the vaccine can be kept out of the traditional 2°C to 8°C temperature range for up to four days without losing potency. It’s a breakthrough that could extend the reach of other vaccines to remote areas where keeping vaccines cold is difficult—an approach that researchers estimate could cut storage and transportation costs in half.

Number of people receiving the MenAfriVac vaccine in 12 African countries (in millions), 2010–2013.
Chart showing number of annual MenAfriVac vaccinations, in the millions: 19.5 in 2010, 35.1 in 2011, 48.6 in 2012, and 50.4 in 2013. Total vaccinated population, in the millions: 19.5 in 2010, 54.6 in 2011, 103.2 in 2012, and 153.6 in 2013.

Key partners: Serum Institute of India Ltd.; WHO; ministries of health in Africa; three dozen global collaborators.

Key funders: Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation; Michael & Susan Dell Foundation; National Philanthropic Trust; Shefa Fund hosted by the Swiss Philanthropy Foundation; US Agency for International Development (USAID); US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC); GAVI Alliance; individual contributors.

MenAfriVac is a registered trademark of Serum Institute of India Ltd.

Milestone

An affordable new vaccine against diarrhea

and a cross-sector partnership model for developing health technologies

Impact

ROTAVAC reduces severe rotavirus diarrhea by 56% in the first year of life, according to a study in the Lancet.

A new vaccine awaiting licensure in India promises to transform the fight against rotavirus, the most lethal cause of diarrhea. ROTAVAC® protects children at a fraction of the price of currently available vaccines. PATH provided technical support on clinical trials and manufacturing issues as part of a unique social innovation partnership, with public- and private-sector partners sharing the risks and costs of vaccine development. This new model could spur the development of other vaccines to meet the needs of low-income countries. We are also working with partners to submit ROTAVAC for WHO prequalification once licensure is granted, a key step in reaching more children.

PATH also helped introduce currently available rotavirus vaccines to seven new countries in 2013 through advocacy and communications support.  

Man looking through microscope.

At just $1 per dose, ROTAVAC could save the lives of thousands of children in low-income countries. Photo: PATH/Gabe Bienczycki.

Baby being given oral rotavirus vaccine drops.

Rotavirus takes the lives of about 100,000 young children each year in India alone. Photo: PATH/Gabe Bienczycki.

Cooler full of vaccine, with a crowd queued up behind it.

PATH builds strong immunization systems to ensure lifesaving vaccines reach even the most remote villages. Photo: PATH/Doune Porter.

Key partners: Bharat Biotech International Ltd.; CDC; Government of India’s Department of Biotechnology; Johns Hopkins University; National Institutes of Health; ROTA Council; Society for Applied Studies; Stanford University School of Medicine; UNICEF; WHO.

Key funders: Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation; GAVI Alliance; Research Council of Norway; UK Department for International Development.

ROTAVAC is a registered trademark of Bharat Biotech International Ltd.

Milestone

A promising malaria vaccine nears the finish line

offering new hope in the fight against a top killer

Group of health workers standing behind seated mothers holding their babies on their laps.
These children in Tanzania are among more than 15,000 African children participating in a phase 3 clinical trial of RTS,S—the most clinically advanced malaria vaccine candidate. Photo: PATH/David Poland.
Impact

Cases of clinical malaria dropped by 46% among toddlers and 27% among infants receiving the RTS,S vaccine candidate during 18 months of follow-up.

What many once thought impossible—developing a vaccine for human use against a parasite—is now on the cusp of reality. PATH is collaborating with GlaxoSmithKline and others in the final phase of clinical trials that could lead to the licensure of a new vaccine shown to help protect young children against the deadliest malaria parasite.

A phase 3 trial with more than 15,000 African children found that the vaccine candidate, RTS,S, continued to protect infants and toddlers from clinical malaria up to 18 months after vaccination. Final trial results will inform a WHO policy recommendation as early as 2015, indicating whether African countries should consider including RTS,S in their immunization programs.

Key partners: GlaxoSmithKline; scientists in Africa, Europe, and the United States.

Key funders: Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation; individual contributors.

Drugs

Groundbreaking approaches to drug development

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Drugs

PATH develops and introduces affordable drugs for diseases that disproportionately affect people in low-income countries, including drugs to treat or prevent diarrhea, HIV, malaria, and newborn infections.

Milestone

A new source of malaria treatment

through a semisynthetic version of artemisinin now prequalified by WHO

Impact

Up to 125 million malaria treatments per year.

Millions more people will benefit from the gold-standard malaria treatment, thanks to a global partnership convened by PATH that developed a semisynthetic form of artemisinin, the key ingredient in artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs). The first nonplant-derived source of artemisinin complements the world’s botanical supply, with the goal of stabilizing prices and ensuring a dependable flow of artemisinin to the market.

The launch of industrial-scale production and WHO prequalification in 2013 capped a nine-year effort to turn this ambitious idea into lifesaving reality. Up to 60 metric tons can be produced each year—enough to meet one-third of the total global need.

Producing semisynthetic artemisinin takes just three months, ensuring a more reliable supply to help meet demand for ACTs.
Illustration of artemisinin plant, lab equipment, and medicine, with text, “Semisynthetic method: fermentation and photochemistry, about 3 months from lab to ACT. Agricultural method: cultivation and extraction, about 10 months from seed to ACT.”

Key partners: Amyris, Inc.; Sanofi; University of California, Berkeley.

Key funder: Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

Milestone

A powerful weapon against newborn infections

with a new version of an antiseptic endorsed by WHO to protect babies

Impact

An estimated 300,000 babies could be saved annually at a cost of less than 50 cents a dose.

Cutting the umbilical cord at birth marks a baby’s first step toward independence. But in developing countries, that simple act too often creates an entry point for deadly infections.

PATH leads an international effort that began in 2007 to adapt a proven antiseptic called chlorhexidine into a new formulation for use on the cord after it is cut. In 2013, WHO endorsed the product, and implementation is under way in 16 countries. Now we are scaling up this lifesaving innovation by supporting country adoption and regional production in Africa to increase availability.

Mother holding her baby.

Infection causes about 13% of the 3 million newborn deaths each year. Lack of hygiene and antiseptics increases the risk of infections. Photo: PATH/Mutsumi Metzler.

Bottle of chlorhexidine drops and tube of chlorhexidine cream.

In 2013, WHO added 7.1% chlorhexidine digluconate, an antiseptic used to clean umbilical cords, to its Model List of Essential Medicines for Children. Photo: PATH.

Map of countries with chlorhexidine programs: Senegal, Liberia, Côte d’Ivoire, Burkina Faso, Niger, Nigeria, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Uganda, Mozambique, Ethiopia, Malawi, Mozambique, Madagascar, Pakistan, Nepal, and Bangladesh.

Sixteen countries are now implementing chlorhexidine programs to reach newborns with this lifesaving product.

Key partners: Members of the Chlorhexidine Working Group.

Key funders: United Nations Commission on Life-saving Commodities for Women and Children through UNICEF; USAID.

Diagnostics

Breakthroughs in detecting disease

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Diagnostics

PATH develops and introduces fast, accurate diagnostic technologies to detect and track cervical cancer, diabetes, HIV, malaria, neglected tropical diseases, tuberculosis, and more.

Milestone

A game-changing test for river blindness

thanks to a new diagnostic tool that can detect exposure to the disease in minutes

Impact

A new tool to fight a disease threatening 180 million+ people worldwide.

PATH developed a new diagnostic tool that promises to accelerate efforts to eliminate river blindness, or onchocerciasis, a leading cause of preventable blindness in Africa. It’s the only antibody test for the detection of river blindness tailored for use in the rural and remote settings where people are most affected by the disease.

This parasitic infection is transmitted through the bite of the blackfly, causing skin disfiguration as well as blindness and driving communities away from productive farm land for fear of infection.

Close-up of hand holding small indicator stick for river blindness test.
A new test for river blindness uses a drop of blood and is fast, accurate, and easy to use. Photo: PATH/Dunia Faulx.

The affordable, easy-to-use test will support ongoing efforts toward disease control and elimination and help prevent reemergence in endemic areas. The test requires only a drop of blood from a finger prick, with results available within 20 minutes. In 2013, we transferred the technology to a South Korean manufacturer and are working together to bring the test to market by the end of this year.

Key partners: African Program for Onchocerciasis Control; Bio-Rad/AbD Serotec; Erasmus University Rotterdam; National Institutes of Health; Standard Diagnostics, Inc.; The Task Force for Global Health; Togo Ministry of Health; University of Tübingen.

Key funder: Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

Devices

Tools that put women in charge of their health

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Devices

PATH works with the people we serve to develop, adapt, and introduce health devices that improve maternal, reproductive, and newborn health; nutrition; and water and sanitation.

Milestone

Family planning, reimagined

with two new barrier contraceptives that expand protection options for women

Illustration of SILCS diaphragm, with text, “Removal dome: allows for easy removal. Rim: provides stability and helps guide the diaphragm during insertion. Cervical cup: accommodates a range of sizes of cervices. Grip dimples: provide a tactile cue for where to hold the rim.”
Impact

New options for 222 million women worldwide who want to avoid pregnancy but aren’t using modern contraception.

The SILCS diaphragm—a one-size-fits-most contraceptive device—is the first new cervical barrier method to reach the market in more than a decade. It went on sale in six European countries in 2013 and is now being reviewed for US regulatory approval. PATH led a public-private partnership that developed this reusable, nonhormonal device, informed by input from women and their partners. Next, we’ll assess where and how to introduce the device in low-resource settings, with market assessments under way in India, South Africa, and Uganda.

The Woman’s Condom (pictured at top of page) was designed by PATH and our partners with input from users to be a next-generation female condom. It was approved for sale in South Africa in 2013. It protects women from both pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections, including HIV. A WHO review now in process could lead to bulk public-sector purchases by United Nations agencies and others.

We are building demand for female condoms overall through campaigns that include an international film contest, with winning films screened in more than ten countries last year.

Key partners: SILCS diaphragm: CONRAD; Kessel Marketing & Vertriebs GmbH. Woman’s Condom: CONRAD; Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Shanghai Dahua Medical Apparatus Co., Ltd.

Key funders: SILCS diaphragm: Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation; USAID; individual contributors. Woman’s Condom: Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation; The Lemelson Foundation; Netherlands Ministry of Foreign Affairs; Universal Access to Female Condoms; USAID; The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation; individual contributors.

System and service innovations

Strategies and tools to build healthy communities

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Systems and service innovations

Health solutions can’t deliver themselves. PATH collaborates with country partners using an array of innovations to strengthen health systems, encourage healthier behaviors, and increase access to affordable solutions.

Milestone

A data-driven strategy to fight HIV/AIDS

powered by real-time information in the Democratic Republic of the Congo

Impact

4,100+ health workers trained since 2009 to mobilize communities and reach the most vulnerable.

Our strategy for helping the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) combat the HIV epidemic gives communities tools to protect themselves, care for those affected by HIV/AIDS, and build up the country’s health system. The PATH-led ProVIC project has helped nearly 1.6 million people get HIV prevention information and 556,000 people receive HIV counseling and testing since 2009.

How do we know it’s working? In 2013, PATH and our partners launched a cloud-based monitoring and evaluation database that allows ProVIC’s staff to analyze and share data across five HIV “hotspots.” For example, the data showed that many mothers in a program to prevent mother-to-child HIV transmission were not following up with treatment. In response, we launched a mother-to-mother mentoring program that more than doubled the number of women on treatment.

In 2013, PATH reached more than 325,000 people in the DRC with HIV prevention, care, and treatment services.
Map showing number of people reached in DRC with HIV services: 68, 320 in Bas-Congo; 84,546 in Kinshasa; 59,831 in Orientale; 41,416 in Sud Kivu (January through September 2013); and 74,590 in Katanga.

Key partners: Chemonics International; Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation; International HIV/AIDS Alliance; nearly 100 local partners.

Key funder: US President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief through USAID.

Milestone

A malaria parasite on the run

through a bold new strategy to eliminate this disease, country by country, once and for all

Impact

A 51% drop in global malaria deaths in young children since 2000 through investments in proven interventions.

You can see the future of malaria in Senegal’s Richard Toll district. Since 2011, PATH has teamed up with employers, pharmacies, government agencies, and others to create zero-malaria-transmission zones by piloting innovative uses of drugs and diagnostics and improving the timeliness and quality of data reporting. In 2013, we expanded the approach to three new districts. Working with a network of partners across Senegal, we have contributed to a 62% drop in malaria deaths since 2006.

Now we are launching an ambitious new malaria agenda, joining forces with countries across Africa to scale up what’s working while generating new approaches and commitments toward our ultimate goal: a malaria-free world.

Three women sitting on a mat, filling out paperwork.

Teams of health workers in Senegal visit households where malaria is reported, testing and treating family members and neighbors to stop disease transmission. Photo: Speak Up Africa.

Close-up of cell phone with malaria data showing on screen.

Health workers use mobile phones to gather and report data on confirmed malaria cases and the available stock of diagnostic tests and treatments. Photo: Speak Up Africa.

Boy lying on the bed while a woman arranges a bednet over him.

With global malaria deaths down sharply, we now have our sights set on stopping malaria transmission altogether. Photo: Speak Up Africa.

Key partners: Governments of Ethiopia, Senegal, and Zambia; Roll Back Malaria Partnership.

Key funders: Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation; individual contributors.

Milestone

Solutions for Kenya’s toughest health challenges

that engage communities and improve care at every level of the health system

Man standing next to a motorcycle used as an ambulance for women in labor.
Motorcycle ambulances help pregnant women in remote communities reach skilled care in time to give birth. Photo: PATH/Gabe Bienczycki.
Impact

A 25% increase in the number of pregnant women seeking skilled deliveries in health facilities supported by PATH in 2013.

Through the PATH-led APHIAplus Western Kenya project, East Africa’s largest integrated health project, we are reaching into villages across western Kenya with proven strategies to tackle this region’s greatest health threats, giving communities the tools to improve their health.

We established a new community-based motorcycle ambulance service that ensures pregnant women get to health clinics for deliveries. We trained some 5,600 community health workers to provide door-to-door health education and support. And we created a comprehensive malaria strategy that brings every available tool to the fight in one of Africa’s highest transmission areas.

In all, we reached more than 3.7 million Kenyans in 2013 with integrated services for HIV/AIDS, malaria, maternal and child health, and tuberculosis.  

Key partners: Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation; Government of Kenya; Jhpiego; World Vision.

Key funder: USAID.

Our finances

In 2013, PATH achieved top marks for financial stewardship.

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“We have a responsibility to those we serve to spend every dollar invested in us efficiently and wisely for the greatest possible health impact. Our top rating from Charity Navigator is testament to our financial stewardship and commitment to driving value.”

—Olivia Polius, Chief Financial Officer, PATH

PATH: Ten years at four stars

Charity Navigator four-star charity.

Charity Navigator, America’s largest independent evaluator of nonprofits, has once again awarded PATH its highest overall rating of four stars.

This is PATH’s tenth consecutive year at four stars, a designation that recognizes our ability to efficiently manage and grow our finances, as well as our organizational accountability and transparency. Just 1% of the more than 7,000 charities rated by Charity Navigator can say the same.

2013 financial summary

Revenue (in thousands)
Foundations$149,791
US government 104,549
Other governments, nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), multilaterals 45,218
Investments 7,323
Individuals/other 6,283
Corporations 1,964
Total revenue $315,128
Expenses (in thousands)
Program services
PROGRAMS:
Product development $57,935
International development49,346
Public health impact29,090
Cross-program initiatives5,522
Subtotal programs141,893
Program subawards124,793
Subtotal program services $266,686
Support services 
Management and general$41,957
Fundraising2,939
Bid and proposal2,433
Subtotal support services$47,329
Total expenses$314,015
Assets (in thousands)
Cash and cash equivalents $88,011
Invested grant funds240,323
Contributions and awards receivable337,191
Other23,974
Total assets$689,499
Liabilities and net assets (in thousands)
Total liabilities $58,028
Net assets
Temporarily restricted$605,699
Unrestricted22,394
Permanently restricted3,378
Total net assets $631,471
Total liabilities and net assets$689,499

Sources of revenue

Revenue chart.
  • 47.6% Foundations
  • 33.2% US government
  • 14.3% Other governments, NGOs, multilaterals
  • 2.3% Investments
  • 2.0% Individuals/other
  • 0.6% Corporations

Use of funds

Use chart.
  • 49.7% Product development
  • 28.8% International development
  • 19.1% Public health impact
  • 2.4% Cross-program initiatives

Expense allocation

Expenses chart.
  • 84.9% Program services
  • 13.4% Management and general
  • 0.9% Fundraising
  • 0.8% Bid and proposal

Figures are presented in US dollars.

Notes: This financial summary is based on PATH’s audited financial statements, which are audited by the firm Clark Nuber P.S. Full copies are available on our website at www.path.org.

PATH is an international, nonprofit, nongovernmental organization. Our mission is to improve the health of people around the world by advancing technologies, strengthening systems, and encouraging healthy behaviosrs. Contributions to PATH are tax-exempt under US IRS code 501(c)(3).

Our leadership

And we harnessed the talents of leaders driven to connect innovation and impact.

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Leadership

Board of directors

Portrait

Jo Addy, MBA, MPA

United States

Founder and Managing Director,
Alsweb Business Advantage
Woodside, CA USA

Portrait

Dean Allen  Vice Chair & Treasurer

United States

CEO, McKinstry
Seattle, WA USA

Portrait

Kofi Amegashie, MSc

Ghana

Managing Executive, Africa,
Adcock Ingram
Johannesburg, South Africa

Portrait

Phyllis Campbell, MBA

United States

Chairman, Pacific Northwest,
JPMorgan Chase & Co.
Seattle, WA USA

Portrait

Alex Chika Ezeh, PhD, MSc

Nigeria

Executive Director,
African Population and Health
Research Center
Nairobi, Kenya

Portrait

George Gotsadze, MD, PhD Chair

Republic of Georgia

Director, Curatio International Foundation
Tbilisi, Georgia

Portrait

Eivor Halkjaer Secretary

Sweden

Former Swedish Ambassador and Former Senior Advisor to the Director General,
Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency
Stockholm, Sweden

Portrait

David King, JD

United States

Chairman and CEO,
LabCorp
Burlington, NC USA

Portrait

Vincent McGee

United States

Former Senior Advisor,
The Atlantic Philanthropies
New York, NY USA

Portrait

Felix Olale, MD, PhD

Kenya

Executive Chairman,
Excelsior Group
New York, NY, USA, and Nairobi, Kenya

Portrait

Kevin Reilly, MBA

United States

Former President,
Wyeth Vaccines and Nutrition
Rosemont, PA USA

Portrait

Rajendra Vattikuti, MS

United States

Founder and Former President and CEO,
Covansys, and
Founder, Vattikuti Foundation
Southfield, MI USA

Executive team

Ayo Ajayi, MD, MPH

Vice President, International Development

Amie Batson, MBA

Chief Strategy Officer

Steve Davis, MA, JD

President and CEO

David C. Kaslow, MD

Vice President, Product Development

Michael Kollins

Chief Operating Officer

Daniel Laster, JD

General Counsel

Roger Nyhus

Vice President, Global Engagement and Communications (interim)

Kathryn O’Driscoll

Chief Human Resources Officer

Olivia Polius

Chief Financial Officer

Jacqueline Sherris, PhD

Vice President, Public Health Impact

Program leaders

International Development

Mona Byrkit, MPH

Mekong region

Carlos C. (Kent) Campbell, MD, MPH

Malaria Control Program

Dwan Dixon, MPH, MA

Ethiopia

Kateryna (Katya) Gamazina, MD

Ukraine

Philippe Guinot, MBA

Senegal

Win May Htway, MD, MPH

Myanmar

Mohammed Makame, MD, MPH

Tanzania

Nanthalile Mugala, MD, MMed

Zambia

Emmanuel Mugisha, PhD, MPH

Uganda

Kevin Osborne, BA (Hons) HDE

South Africa

Mary Prum

Cambodia

Rikka Trangsrud, MA

Kenya

Tarun Vij, MBA

India

Product Development

Ashley Birkett, PhD

Malaria Vaccine Initiative

John Boslego, MD

Vaccine Development

Anurag Mairal, PhD, MBA

Technology Solutions

Kathleen Neuzil, MD, MPH

Vaccine Access and Delivery

Ponni Subbiah, MD, MPH

Drug Development

Jiankang (Jack) Zhang, MS, MBA

China

Public Health Impact

Grant Colfax, MD

HIV/AIDS and Tuberculosis

Jane Hutchings, MPH

Reproductive Health

Dai Hozumi, MD

Maternal and Child Health and Nutrition (interim)

PATH office locations

Office map

Bangladesh | Dhaka

Belgium | Brussels

Cambodia | Phnom Penh

China | Beijing

Democratic Republic of the Congo | Bunia, Kinshasa, Kisangani, Lubumbashi

Ethiopia | Addis Ababa

France | Ferney-Voltaire

Ghana | Accra, Kpaguri, Kumasi

India | Lucknow, Mumbai, New Delhi

Kenya | Bungoma, Busia, Homa Bay, Kakamega, Kisii, Kisumu, Migori, Nairobi

Mozambique | Maputo

Myanmar | Yangon

Peru | Lima

Senegal | Dakar

South Africa | Empangeni, Johannesburg, Kuruman, Sedibeng, Witbank

Switzerland | Geneva

Tanzania | Arusha, Dar es Salaam

Uganda | Kampala

Ukraine | Kyiv

United States | Seattle, South San Francisco, Washington, DC

Vietnam | Hanoi

Zambia | Lusaka, Ndola

Our supporters

Your support fuels transformative innovation that touches millions around the world. Thank you.

 

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Our supporters are essential partners in our work to bring innovation to life. In 2013, more than 2,500 individual donors, foundations, corporations, and institutions invested in that work.

Flexible funding from our individual contributors plays a catalytic role in accelerating innovation, helping to advance many of the milestones highlighted here. In 2013, our supporters also helped increase hepatitis B vaccination rates in Vietnam, fight micronutrient deficiencies in Brazil through our Ultra Rice® technology, and scale up a pasteurization system in South Africa to ensure the safety of breast milk donated for vulnerable infants.

This list includes supporters providing $1,000 or more in funding to PATH through grants, donations, and in-kind contributions in 2013. We are grateful to all of our supporters. Become a supporter or learn more about the essential role that individuals play in our work.

Foundations

Anonymous (3)

Abbott Fund

Aetna Foundation, Inc.

Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

Children's Investment Fund Foundation

The Cleveland H. Dodge Foundation

Conrad N. Hilton Foundation

Dean & Vicki Allen/McKinstry Charitable Foundation

Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation

ExxonMobil Foundation

Fletcher Bay Foundation

Foundation for Development of Ukraine

Foundation for Innovative New Diagnostics

The Frankel Foundation

Fred H. Bixby Foundation

Grand Rapids Community Foundation

The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation

Keith & Mary Kay McCaw Family Foundation

The Kuehlthau Family Foundation

Laird Norton Family Foundation

Lawrence & Elaine Irell Foundation

MAC AIDS Fund

Martin-Fabert Foundation

McMinn Foundation

Medtronic Foundation

The Merck Company Foundation

M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust

Moccasin Lake Foundation

The Norcliffe Foundation

Open Society Foundations

The Overbrook Foundation

The Rockefeller Foundation

Roklen Foundation

Satya and Rao Remala Foundation

Shickman Family Foundation

Skoll Foundation

Starbucks Foundation

Stavros Niarchos Foundation

Susan G. Komen for the Cure®

Thrivent Financial for Lutherans® Foundation

Tides Foundation

UBS Optimus Foundation

United Nations Foundation

Vitol Foundation

Washington Women’s Foundation

Weber Shain Foundation

Whatley Foundation

The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation

The Wilson Family Foundation

Governments and international agencies

Canadian International Development Agency

Defense Threat Reduction Agency

Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit

GAVI Alliance

Ministry of Foreign Affairs, the Netherlands

Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Norway

Ministry of Public Health, Thailand

National Health Security Office, Thailand

National Institutes of Health

National Lung Hospital, Vietnam

National Science Foundation

Norwegian Agency for Development Cooperation

Pan American Health Organization

Thai Health Promotion Foundation

UK Department for International Development

Union for International Cancer Control

United Nations Children’s Fund

United Nations Development Programme

United Nations Environment Programme

United Nations Office for Project Services

United Nations Population Fund

US Agency for International Development

US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

US Department of Agriculture

US Department of Health and Human Services

US Department of State

The World Bank Group

World Health Organization

Nongovernmental and health organizations and universities

Abt Associates

ACCESS Health International

Agros International

Cancer Research UK

Catapult.org

Centre for Health Solutions–Kenya

Chemonics International

dance4life International

Digital Green

Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative

FHI 360

Georgia Institute of Technology

Global Alliance for TB Drug Development

Global Health Innovative Technology Fund

Gynuity Health Projects

ICF International

Instituto de Salud Global de Barcelona

International Clinical Epidemiology Network

International Development Enterprises

International Potato Center/Centro Internacional de la Papa

IntraHealth International, Inc.

Jhpiego

John Snow, Inc.

Johns Hopkins University

Keck Graduate Institute of Applied Life Sciences

Management Sciences for Health

New York University

Norwegian Cancer Society

Pathfinder International

PCI

The Population Council

Population Services International

The Research Council of Norway

Roll Back Malaria Partnership

St. Anthony Parish

Save the Children

SightLife

Swedish Medical Center

The Task Force for Global Health

Tulane University

University of Georgia

University of Maryland

University of Washington

University Research Co., LLC

Women Deliver

Corporations

Anonymous (3)

Arbor Vita Corporation

AVIE Consulting Inc.

Bank of America Merrill Lynch

Becton, Dickinson and Company

Beijing Tiantan Biological Products Co., Ltd.

Bell Harbor International Conference Center

BHP Billiton Sustainable Communities Trust

Blistex Inc.

CH2M HILL

Chevron Corporation

Claremont BioSolutions

Clark Nuber P.S.

Crucell

Davis Wright Tremaine LLP

Delta Dental of Washington

DSM Nutritional Products

Eulysis Ltd.

Evergreen Associates Ltd.

FactSet Research Systems Inc.

Genentech, Inc.

GlaxoSmithKline

The Global Good Fund I, LLC

GMMB

Goldman Sachs Group, Inc.

Google Inc.

Hewlett-Packard Development Company, LP

Hotchkis & Wiley Capital Management, LLC

Johnson & Johnson

JPMorgan Chase

Key Lime Interactive, LLC

Kinzer Real Estate

Laerdal Global Health A/S

Masimo Corporation

MasterCard Worldwide

Matthew G. Norton Co.

MBio Diagnostics, Inc.

Merck & Co., Inc.

Microsoft Corporation

Novartis

Outerwall

Parker, Smith & Feek

The Pfizer Foundation

Ponte Travels, LLC

Puget Sound Business Journal

Riddell Williams P.S.

Russell Investments

Sanergy

Sanofi Pasteur India

Seattle Mariners

The Seneca Real Estate Group, Inc.

SID Technologies, LLC

SkB Architects, Inc.

UST Global Inc.

Vulcan Real Estate

Waggener Edstrom Worldwide

Waldron

The Walt Disney Company

Zyomyx, Inc.

President’s Council ($10,000+)

Anonymous (4)

Aetna Foundation, Inc.

Dean & Vicki Allen/McKinstry Charitable Foundation

Amie Batson and Orin Levine

Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

Bruce and Ann Blume

Jan Bruno

Don Burdick

Phyllis and Bill Campbell

Whit and Mary Carhart

Dr. Bruce L.A. Carter and Mrs. Jean Enersen

Catapult.org

Laurence and Michele Chang

Brad and Judy Chase

Bill and Paula Clapp

The Cleveland H. Dodge Foundation

Lisa and Tom Cohen

Molly Joel Coye, MD

Leslie Danoff and Lawrence Robbins

Marc and Maud Daudon

Drs. Chris and Kathleen Davis

Estate of Richard Davis

Steve Davis and Bob Evans

Dr. Christopher J. Elias and Ms. Therese Caouette

Stephanie Evans

Judith Fong

The Frankel Foundation

Andrew Frey

Earl and Mary Kay Gardner

Christopher and Sharon Glode

Google Inc.

Adrian Graham

Matt Griffin and Evelyne Rozner

Dr. F. Ann Hayes

Jens Hilscher and Monica Singhal

Joel Holsinger

Howard and Nancy Johnson

JPMorgan Chase

John Kastellec and Katie Henneman

Patricia Keegan and Tom Lennon

Keith & Mary Kay McCaw Family Foundation

Emily and Michael Kohler

Sara and Mark Kranwinkle

Daniel Laster

Lutz Latta

Martin-Fabert Foundation

Vincent McGee

Microsoft Corporation

Moccasin Lake Foundation

The Norcliffe Foundation

Kathy O’Driscoll

Open Road Alliance

Dana I. Pigott

John and Megan Pigott

Kevin Reilly

Satya and Rao Remala Foundation

Benjamin E. Segal and Jacqueline Mahal

Shickman Family Foundation

Paul M. Silver and Christina Marra

Stavros Niarchos Foundation

Dr. Scott C. and Mrs. Colleen Stromatt

Cynthia Stroum

Sarah Temple and Peggy Johnston

Matt Thomlinson and Dana Hurley

Waggener Edstrom Worldwide

Dilip Wagle and Darshana Shanbhag

Ruth and Todd Warren

The Wilson Family Foundation

Martin and Geana Wolfram

David Wu and Richard Hansen

Melissa Waggener Zorkin

PATH Associates ($1,000–$9,999)

Anonymous (20)

Tamara Abell

Eddie Adkins and Jeff Mendell

Ellen Aho

Chris Ajemian and Megan Bowman

Tom Alberg and Judi Beck

Uhl Albert

Dr. Mark Alderson

Stephen Alley and Amy Scott

Laurie and Michael Almoslino

Lisa and Michael Anderson

Lynda and Dean Anderson

Animas Ear and Sinus Clinic

Radar Annand

Brian Arbogast and Valerie Tarico

Fred and Mary Jo Armbrust

Genevieve and John Ashford

William Aughenbaugh

Allison Augustyn and Michael Kollins

Patrice and Kevin Auld

Anne and Joe Aumell

AVIE Consulting Inc.

Pauline and Robert Bach

Bruce Bagley

David and Cynthia Baker

Bank of America Merrill Lynch

Megan Barnard

Linda S. Barnes and Edward Swan II

Jillian Barron and Jonas Simonis

Lynly Beard

Rick and Amy Beckett

Carl and Renee Behnke

Bell Harbor International Conference Center

Steve Belmont and Mary Scheller

Hal Berenson and Laura Ackerman

Franklin Bjorseth

Heather and Ed Blahous

Frank Blethen

Blistex Inc.

Jabe Blumenthal and Julie Edsforth

Karen Bohmke and Bob Levine

Marcy Bordeaux

Sue and Brad Borgman

Dr. John W. Boslego

David Brenner

Margaret Dodd Britton

Dennis and Bobbi Brown

Bill Bryant and Barbara Feasey

Victoria Buker

Virginia Burdette

Mark Busto and Maureen Lee

Kent and Liz Campbell

David and Heidi Capelli

Diana Carey

Stephen Carr

Nicole and Hugh Chang

Patricia Char and Thomas Bingham

Joseph Charles

Mark Chee

Andrew Chen and Andrea Levinson

Ram and Prasanna Cherala

Clark Nuber P.S.

Christopher Cluett

Beth Cobert

Dr. Rennie Coit

Kit and Ginny Colbert

Mary and Mark Comer

Sharon Cooper and Dan Koebel

Jeff Coopersmith

Benjamin Cornell

Gail Craddock

Ty Cramer and Steve Romein

Steve Crane

Kristy and Dan Crouse

Grace Crowley

P. Scott and Kathleen Cummins

Dr. Susanna L. Cunningham

Mark and Becky Curtis

Larry Dart

Lloyd David and Michelle Marshall

Murray and Daphne David

Davis Wright Tremaine LLP

Mark and Christina Dawson

Peter de Boor and Geneva Moores

Katherine and David De Bruyn

Robin Dearling and Gary Ackerman

Greg Delmar and Melissa Felix

Delta Dental of Washington

Julyne Derrick

Carla DewBerry

Sara Dickerman and Andrew Shuman

Jerry Diercks and Deb Prince

Dr. Roscius N. Doan and Dr. Virginia Warfield

Lisa and Bob Donegan

Emer Dooley and Robert Short

Mairead Droney Okon

Drs. Peter Dull and Judith Tsui

Barton and Andrea Duncan

Gordon and Nancy Duncan

Marcia Durfee, MD†

Anna and Garrison Dyer

Kathleen and George Edwards

Megin and Derek Edwards

Nancy Edwards

Nancy Elliott

Alfred Ellis

Catherine Endicott

Nancy R. and Lowell H. Ericsson

Evergreen Associates Ltd.

Benjamin Ewing and Alison Hobbs

Dr. Alex Chika Ezeh

FactSet Research Systems Inc.

Brad Fagan

Justin Fay

Juanita Felton

John and Patricia Flavio

Fletcher Bay Foundation

Micki and Robert Flowers

Bert and Candace Forbes

Michael Ford and Elizabeth Davidow

Dr. Lisa Frenkel

Janet Frohnmayer and David Marques

Arthur Furukawa

Mike Galgon

Leslie Garrison and Michael Weiss

James Gelman

Genentech, Inc.

Katharyn Gerlich

Yvette and Neil Gerrans

John Giglio

Ken and Sandy Glass

Cathy Gleason

GMMB

Bernard and Rochelle Goffe

Goldman Sachs Group, Inc.

Dr. Allen M. and Mrs. Carol S. Gown

Grand Rapids Community Foundation

Bud Green and Linda Gainer

Frank Greer and Stephanie Solien

Dr. Jeffrey Greve

Sean L. Guichon

Genevieve and Brent Guinn

Alexander Gurzhi

Mai Ha

Eivor Halkjaer

Bill Halstenrud

Nick and Leslie Hanauer

Tamaji Harmin

Mark and Julie Harrison

Dr. Laura J. Hart and Mr. Rich Grady

Linda Hartzell

Michele and David Hasson

Robert Hatcher

Rodger Heggen

Jean-Francois and Catherine Heitz

Bob and Linda Helsell

Robert Henry and Lee Foote

Elizabeth Hesse

Brendan Hickey

Gordon Hildebrant

Dr. Vaughn Himes and Ms. Martie Ann Bohn

Rodney Hines

Michael Hite

Toni Hoover

Andrew Hosch

Hotchkis & Wiley Capital Management, LLC

Jessica Hu and Jonathan Eddy

Katherine Humphrey

Sam Hunter and Val Thomas

Patricia Huntington

Scott and Dana Jackson

Jan and Bernie Jacobs

Cris and Bruce Jaffe

Laura and Jim Jantos

Mark and Susan Janus

Sanjay and Seema Jejurikar

Tracy Johannsen

Dr. Cynthia Johnson

David Johnson

Johnson & Johnson

Michael Jones

Ajay and Rohini Kamath

Ragui Kamel

Mr. and Mrs. Michael Kamfonas

Dale S. Kammerlohr

Amy Sisi Kapp

Jim Karambeles

Dr. Mitchell Karton and Ann Gardner

Vijay Karunamurthy

Kate Kaufman

Justin Keat

Nora and Geoffrey Kenway

Key Lime Interactive, LLC

Debbie Killinger

Jim and Lisa King

Craig and Danna Kinzer

Kinzer Real Estate

Leah Klein

Jay Kloosterboer and Barbara Zicari

Marilyn and Gary Kneepkens

Neil Korman

Catherine Kouchakji

John and Traudi Krausser

Anne and Michael Krepick

Hosanna Krienke

Jody and David Kris

The Kuehlthau Family Foundation

Mr. Sanjiv Kumar and Ms. Mansoora Rashid

Joel and Holly Kurtzberg

David Landau and Tanya Brunner

Toni Langlinais

Earl and Kristin Lasher

Alida and Christopher Latham

Lawrence & Elaine Irell Foundation

Doug J. Lee and Lyn Sullivan Lee

Constance Lehman

Bill Lewis

Don and Carla Lewis

Georgie Lindquist

James J. and Kathleen C. Lippard

Carmelita Logerwell

Susan Lusty and Joseph Staten

Nick MacPhee

Anne Marie MacPherson and Chris Davis

Jan-Willem Maessen

Kerry Maguire and Tom Stossel

Richard Mahoney

Jason Malinowski

John and Nancy Malo

Umesh and Katina Marathe

Carl March

Amy Bode and Tony Marfin

James and Casey Margard

Bill and Chris Marks

Peter and Deborah Martin

Peter R. Mason and Roberta Riley

Chris Massot and Vivian Muehlen

Miciah Masters

Peggy Masterson and Gary Blevins

Matthew G. Norton Co.

Dr. Donald and Mrs. Kate Maurer

Noah Mayer

James Maynard

Dennis Mayock

Balaji Mayreddy

Pamela and Bob McCabe

Cara McDermott and Scott Gardner

Evan McDonald-Stewart

William F. and Marcia McInerney

Meghan McKeever and Mike Anderson

Bruce McKinney

Frank and Pam McKulka

McMinn Foundation

The Merck Company Foundation

Mac and Frances Merenda

Jamie and Jeff Merriman-Cohen

John and Irene Meulemans

Lawrence and Bernie Meurk

Don and Maxine Miller

Peter Miller and Jean Johnson

Susan Miller and Kenneth Kendler

David Milloy

Jens Molbak

Mary E. Montgomery

Monty Montoya

Dr. Kathleen A. Mooney

Anthony Moore

Chase Morgan

Gena Morgan and Laurence Da-Tuh Chen

Peggy Morrow

Sandra J. Moss

Paul and Susan Moulton

Hal and Sue Mozer

Ulrich Mueller and Diana Ensenat

Duncan D. Murdoch and Wai Ling Chan

Gregory Muren

Vetrivel Natarajan

Laurie and Greg Nelson

Drs. Dan and Kathy Neuzil

Connie Niva

Novartis

Roger Nyhus

Mary Odermat

John and Deanna Oppenheimer

Mary Pat and John Osterhaus

Outerwall

The Overbrook Foundation

Diana Pallais

Doug Palm and Deborah Lyman-Palm

Parker, Smith & Feek

Ami and Dinesh Patel

Jon Pauley

Norma Pawley

Cem Paya

Ron Pederson

Shelley and Michael Perino

Dr. Gordon W. and Mrs. Elizabeth Perkin

Heidi Peterson

The Pfizer Foundation

Susan Phan

Louise Pietrafesa

Kalinda and Michael Piper

Olivia Polius

Ponte Travels, LLC

Karen M. Porterfield

Christopher Pratley

Linda Preizler

Thomas Price, MD

Francis Proctor

John Proffett and Sunyoung Lee

Puget Sound Business Journal

Erick and Marta Rabins and Family

Jeffrey and Tricia Raikes

Neela Ramaswamy

Fred Ramsdell

Helen Ranney and Family

Julia D. Rea and Jim Diamond

Nancy C. Renault

Warren Rheaume and Catherine Torlai

Chris Richey

Riddell Williams P.S.

Catherine and Thurston Roach

Richard and Bonnie Robbins

Edna Nieves Roberts

Chris and Heidi Rogers

Roklen Foundation

Michael Rollinger

The Rollins Family

Koryn Rolstad

Elizabeth Romney and Jim Giles

Matt Rosauer

Margaret and James Rose

Keith Rowe and Ann Stover

William and Jill Ruckelshaus

Elizabeth Rudolf

Glenn and Laura Ruskaup

Russell Investments

Vikram and Jessica Sahney

St. Anthony Parish

Kelly and Larry Sanderson

Jean and Jack Sargent

Robbie and Sarah Sawers

Steven and Julie Schiller

Bill Schliiter

Kay and Greg Schroedl

Katherine James Schuitemaker

Daniel Schwartz

Cheryl Scott

Seattle Mariners

Laine Seeley

Ron and Sharon Selset

The Seneca Real Estate Group, Inc.

Paula Senior

John and Miriam Sevy

Malay and Avani Shah

Anthony Shapiro and Karen Sparks

Carol Shaw

Pete Shelkin and Beverly Groner

Mark A. Shepard

Dr. Jacqueline Sherris and Dr. Peter Rabinovitch

Sameer Shikalgar

Sondra Shira

Gretchen and Chuck Shively

Cynthia Shurtleff

SightLife

Ben Sihota

Keith Sink and Michelle Christenbur-Sink

SkB Architects, Inc.

Robin Smiley

Candace Smith and Steven Bolliger

Nancy Lee Smith

Sheila Smith

William A. Snyder

Helen Sofaer and Luke Caldwell

Gretchen Sorensen and Gene Stout

Larry and Elizabeth Soriano

Richard Southern

Christina M. Spadoni

Suzanne Stafford

Mike and Kathy Stanley

Patty Stonesifer and Michael Kinsley

Robert and Kathryn Strong

Dick and Tilda Swanson

Eric Swanson

Swedish Medical Center

Daniel Syrdal

Gary Tabasinske

Edward and Victoria Tackenberg

Raj V. Tahil

Alan Taylor and Hans Reiser

Chris and Jenn Taylor

Lucian and Kristin Taylor

Brian Theyel and Elizabeth Sullivan

Cecile Thomas

Sri and David Thornton

Donna and Thorwald Thorson

Alex and Alicia Thrasher

Thrivent Financial for Lutherans® Foundation

Diane Tice

Tides Foundation

Julien Tinnes

Rikka Trangsrud

Brookes and Judy Treidler

Dave and Victoria Trimmer

Bethany and Josh Tuggle

Dr. Joseph Turian

UST Global Inc.

Janet and Stanley Vail

Renaat Van den Hooff

Aly Vander Stoep and Megan Karch

Vijay and Sita Vashee

Nicholas Vavra

Ajarie Visessiri

Anne Von Rosenstiel

Steve Voorhees

Vulcan Real Estate

Dennis Wackerbarth

Waldron

Tom and Pamela Waldron

Margaret and Douglas Walker

Mary and Eric Walker

Joseph Wallin

The Walt Disney Company

Scott and Mimi Warner

Washington Women’s Foundation

Jennifer Weber and Tim Hannon

Weber Shain Foundation

Justin Wee

David and Marsha Weil

Heather and James Weimann

Cynthia Wells and Tim Kerr

Rebecca Wells

Sally and Andrew Westbrook

Whatley Foundation

Mark Wheeler, MD

Marjorie Whiting

Joseph Whittinghill

Turi Widsteen

Kathleen and John Wilcox

Gayna Williams and Jonathan Grudin

Nancy Willner

Elliot Wilson

Jan and Lawrence Wilson

Bill and Elissa Wolf-Tinsman

Sarah Wolz and Peter Ory

Karen Wong-Duncan and Richard Duncan

Josh Woodward

H.S. Wright III and Katherine Janeway

Sidney C. Wright

Sheila and Gerald Wroblewski

Susie Wyckoff

Jennifer Yim

Edward and Marcy Yoshida

JoAnn Yoshimoto

Daphne Young

Nancy Young

Rebecca J. Zanatta

Isabel Zaror and Steven Potter

Judith Zeh

Paul and Margot Zimmerman

†Deceased

Catalyst Circle ($1,000+ per year for at least five years)

Anonymous

Ellen Aho

Chris Ajemian and Megan Bowman

Dean & Vicki Allen/McKinstry Charitable Foundation

Lynda and Dean Anderson

Allison Augustyn and Michael Kollins

Patrice and Kevin Auld

Anne and Joe Aumell

Bruce Bagley

Linda S. Barnes and Edward Swan II

Amie Batson and Orin Levine

Lynly Beard

Rick and Amy Beckett

Heather and Ed Blahous

Bruce and Ann Blume

Amy Bode and Tony Marfin

Karen Bohmke and Bob Levine

David Brenner

Margaret Dodd Britton

Bill Bryant and Barbara Feasey

Victoria Buker

Virginia Burdette

Don Burdick

Phyllis and Bill Campbell

Diana Carey

Whit and Mary Carhart

Dr. Bruce L.A. Carter and Mrs. Jean Enersen

Nicole and Hugh Chang

Ram and Prasanna Cherala

Lisa and Tom Cohen

Dr. Rennie Coit

Mary and Mark Comer

Sharon Cooper and Dan Koebel

Jeff Coopersmith

Molly Joel Coye, MD

Steve Crane

Kristy and Dan Crouse

P. Scott and Kathleen Cummins

Dr. Susanna L. Cunningham

Mark and Becky Curtis

Larry Dart

Marc and Maud Daudon

Drs. Chris and Kathleen Davis

Steve Davis and Bob Evans

Katherine and David De Bruyn

Robin Dearling and Gary Ackerman

Dr. Roscius N. Doan and Dr. Virginia Warfield

Emer Dooley and Robert Short

Gordon and Nancy Duncan

Marcia Durfee, MD†

Kathleen and George Edwards

Megin and Derek Edwards

Dr. Christopher J. Elias and Ms. Therese Caouette

Catherine Endicott

Evergreen Associates Ltd.

John and Patricia Flavio

Micki and Robert Flowers

Judith Fong

Janet Frohnmayer and David Marques

Leslie Garrison and Michael Weiss

Ken and Sandy Glass

Cathy Gleason

Bernard and Rochelle Goffe

Dr. Allen M. and Mrs. Carol S. Gown

Bud Green and Linda Gainer

Genevieve and Brent Guinn

Dr. Laura J. Hart and Mr. Rich Grady

Linda Hartzell

Michele and David Hasson

Dr. F. Ann Hayes

Rodger Heggen

Jean-Francois and Catherine Heitz

Bob and Linda Helsell

Dr. Vaughn Himes and Ms. Martie Ann Bohn

Michael Hite

Toni Hoover

Sam Hunter and Val Thomas

Scott and Dana Jackson

Jan and Bernie Jacobs

Cris and Bruce Jaffe

Laura and Jim Jantos

Sanjay and Seema Jejurikar

Tracy Johannsen

Dr. Cynthia Johnson

Ajay and Rohini Kamath

Patricia Keegan and Tom Lennon

Debbie Killinger

Jim and Lisa King

Craig and Danna Kinzer

Leah Klein

Catherine Kouchakji

John and Traudi Krausser

Toni Langlinais

Earl and Kristin Lasher

Daniel Laster

Carmelita Logerwell

Nick MacPhee

Anne Marie MacPherson and Chris Davis

Kerry Maguire and Tom Stossel

Carl March

James and Casey Margard

Peggy Masterson and Gary Blevins

Dr. Donald and Mrs. Kate Maurer

Pamela and Bob McCabe

Vincent McGee

Frank and Pam McKulka

Don and Maxine Miller

Moccasin Lake Foundation

Jens Molbak

Mary E. Montgomery

Monty Montoya

Chase Morgan

Gena Morgan and Laurence Da-Tuh Chen

Peggy Morrow

Paul and Susan Moulton

Ulrich Mueller and Diana Ensenat

Drs. Dan and Kathy Neuzil

Mary Odermat

Kathy O’Driscoll

John and Deanna Oppenheimer

Mary Pat and John Osterhaus

Doug Palm and Deborah Lyman-Palm

Ron Pederson

Heidi Peterson

Louise Pietrafesa

Karen M. Porterfield

Linda Preizler

Erick and Marta Rabins and Family

Kevin Reilly

Catherine and Thurston Roach

Koryn Rolstad

Elizabeth Romney and Jim Giles

Matt Rosauer

Margaret and James Rose

Keith Rowe and Ann Stover

William and Jill Ruckelshaus

Satya and Rao Remala Foundation

Kay and Greg Schroedl

Ron and Sharon Selset

Paula Senior

John and Miriam Sevy

Carol Shaw

Dr. Jacqueline Sherris and Dr. Peter Rabinovitch

Gretchen and Chuck Shively

Paul M. Silver and Christina Marra

Robin Smiley

Nancy Lee Smith

Gretchen Sorensen and Gene Stout

Larry and Elizabeth Soriano

Mike and Kathy Stanley

Dr. Scott C. and Mrs. Colleen Stromatt

Cynthia Stroum

Daniel Syrdal

Gary Tabasinske

Sarah Temple and Peggy Johnston

Cecile Thomas

Matt Thomlinson and Dana Hurley

Sri and David Thornton

Donna and Thorwald Thorson

Rikka Trangsrud

Renaat Van den Hooff

Aly Vander Stoep and Megan Karch

Vijay and Sita Vashee

Steve Voorhees

Tom and Pamela Waldron

Mary and Eric Walker

Scott and Mimi Warner

Ruth and Todd Warren

Jennifer Weber and Tim Hannon

Heather and James Weimann

Cynthia Wells and Tim Kerr

Rebecca Wells

Mark Wheeler, MD

Kathleen and John Wilcox

Nancy Willner

Jan and Lawrence Wilson

Sarah Wolz and Peter Ory

H.S. Wright III and Katherine Janeway

David Wu and Richard Hansen

Edward and Marcy Yoshida

JoAnn Yoshimoto

Rebecca J. Zanatta

Melissa Waggener Zorkin

†Deceased

PATH Futures

Anonymous (2)

June Barrick

Lisa and Tom Cohen

Sharon Cooper and Dan Koebel

Estate of Richard Davis

Steve Davis and Bob Evans

Katherine and David De Bruyn

Ms. Patricia Dolan and Dr. Douglas Cederblom

Matt Griffin and Evelyne Rozner

Jessica Hu and Jonathan Eddy

Lee D. Hwang

Jan and Bernie Jacobs

Marlene Koons

Jaen and Connie Lawrence

Georgie Lindquist

James J. and Kathleen C. Lippard

Mary E. Montgomery

Bob Moore

Peggy Morrow

Erick and Marta Rabins and Family

Dr. Susan Safer

Patrick and Karen Scott

Michael Sullivan

Anne Von Rosenstiel

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